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Bookmark this: Social Media Workshop June 1

It is exciting to announce our first mini conference on Social Media. Sarah Stoodley agreed to do a presentation on Twitter - sharing strategies learned as the official Tweeter for Memorial University (@memorialu).
Sarah is such a vivacious presenter and has a host of real life examples that she draws from.

John Feltham will present a few of the exciting case studies that he has worked on. John played a significant role in creating an initial Social Media plan for Newfoundland and Labrador Tourism, did it again last year for Targa Newfoundland and more recently for Ruckus on the Edge - the week long music fest that accompanied the 2010 Juno Awards.

I am pleased to be co-presenting with these two leading edge social media marketers and will draw on my experience in business to make sure the content is focused on entrepreneurs who want to grow their businesses.

Check out more information about the One-day Social Media Intensive and register online to ensure you get your seat. We are keeping the groups small so that there are lots of opportunities to share information.

And I'll be amiss not to mention the lovely venue - Myx Meeting Centre - and chef Denise's amazing cooking! (Yes, breakfast, lunch and refreshments!)

Register for One-Day Social Media Intensive in St. John's Newfoundland & Labrador,   on Eventbrite

Juno Awards' Melanie Berry's Top 10 for 2010

In a recent presentation to the members of NLOWE at a breakfast session, CARAS CEO Melanie Berry shared her top ten entrepreneurial priorities for 2010 while in St. John's for final arrangements for the 2010 Juno Music Awards.


Expressing the value of mentorship in her career, Ms. Berry cited these as her important entrepreneurship and life lessons:
  1. Always treat others as you would like to be treated.
  2. Do what is RIGHT, not what is EASIEST.
  3. Pick your battles - don't waste time with unimportant issues
  4. Think about the big picture and do not be distracted by the little issues
  5. Value your friends
  6. It is what it is - realize what you can change and what you cannot
  7. Take time to learn from your mistakes
  8. Celebrate successes
  9. Always admit when you're wrong
  10. Love what you do - you have to love your job.
Melanie also emphasized the importance of having a strong support system you can rely on - and cited her parents as playing this important role in her success. This video that was taken at the event, lets you share in her positivity and enthusiasm for what she does.

11 Hot Tips for Techknowledgeable Writing

Well... they were hot when I wrote them originally 4 years ago. But I think it is still valid for creators of website content - layout and presentation can make or break the deal...

1. Put yourself in the reader's position
What is the most important thing on your website or in our email, newsletter or blog for users? (Use your web statistics to form and opinion on this.) In each and every article, try to pinpoint what users will find to be most interesting or useful, and focus on this.

2. Use the right trigger words (key word)
When users come to your website, they have a mental picture of what they seek, often a so-called "trigger word". If they come from a search engine, is is the word that they used in their search query.

If a user is searching for "glasses" , he (read "she" if you prefer) will not automatically click on the word "visual aids". It is for this reason that it is counter-productive to use the jargon in articles or navigation bars.

Jargon fails because the user is looking for his trigger word, and does not find it. Therefore; fine out which words your users like to use and to describe their search. Use these words and not your own internal jargon!

3. Write meaningful headlines
In order for a reader to get interested in an article, web page, long email, blog or newsletter, he has to know what the article or page is about. After that, the reader will determine whether it is relevant and interesting and whether it answers his current question.

Therefore: A good headline uses relevant trigger words (see above) and is descriptive - telling what the article is about. If you have a web page about offshore oil exploration off the coast of Newfoundland, "Newfoundland offshore oil exploration" would be a good title, and "Newfoundland economy" would not.

Remember that headlines can end up being the entire story (when the article is placed lower on the screen, or when another site quotes your content). Then the headline will have to stand alone - with neither picture or sub-header to support it - and still be able to convey the news.

4. Write the article as a teaser
A "teaser" consisting of a headline, sub-headline and picture, should be able to inform the user of an event to such a degree that a user that is in a hurry (or who is only reading superficially) does not need to read the whole story. Those who are interested in reading more about the topic can click in on the entire story, while those who aren't, will still get the basic information.

5. Use the most appropriate presentation method
Information can be presented in many different ways. By analyzing and organizing your content you will be in a good position to select the best presentation method. Choose from:
  • bullet and numbered lists,
  • tables,
  • graphs,
  • flowcharts and
  • diagrams.
6. Help readers down the page
Let the reader get a quick grasp of the article by simply glancing at the page. Techniques to help readers down the page, are:
  • SUB-HEADERS
  • Bullet Points
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bold words (preferably trigger words)
Remember that these elements must give a complete description of the article when the reader simply looks down the page (seeing only the headlines, links, points and bold or underlined words). Pay attention to the fact that you can spin or twist a whole article by choosing to make one word bold, so be careful.

7. Create space on the screen
Few things kill a reader's desire to read, like a massive and visually impenetrable block of letters. Only the most motivated readers will dare to read such an article (basically fewer than 5 per cent - check your website statistics if you do not believe me!

Therefore: Create space! Break text up into paragraphs, sub-titles, pictures, lists and bold words so that the page doesn't appear like a fortress.

8. A picture is worth more than a 1000 words...
Text is not the best medium to convey all types of information. So, consider whether your information can be conveyed better via pictures, numbers, models, diagrams etc.

9. Say it as simply as possible
Write simply and directly. To achieve this, think "How would I explain this to a grade 4 student?" or "What would I have said if this were a classified advertisement?"

The intention is not to underestimate the reader, but to write in an inclusive way. If you need to write an extensive and complex article (a research report, a medical analysis etc.) consider breaking it into smaller parts (see Tip 7).

10. Layer it
If you must convey a demanding text, consider doing it over two different pages: Make one simple article, which explains where the content can be obtained, or which presents the main points of the larger article.

Set up a link to the entire report/text/evaluation for those who are particularly interested in it, from where it can also be printed.

11. Watch out for typing errors!
It is hard to catch your own mistakes, so set up routines whereby a colleague double-checks your work, if possible. Spell-check your own work. Remember that a misspelled word not only looks unprofessional, but can also confuse a search engine. A user looking for "Canada" on your web site will not get a hit for an article that mentions "Caanada".

What Twitter Can Do For You

There is often Much A-twitter About Nothing, as Shakespeare no doubt would have said today. But hard to dispute is that Twitter is being used to deliver results, and here are some suggestions how...

A business acquaintance of mine manages a hotel in a scenic travel destination that is somewhat off the beaten track. Every morning he searches Twitter, using a few key words that include the name of his region, his town, the nearest airport and ferry terminal. By responding to the tweets of travelers looking for travel information ("Heading to Gros Morne - any travel tips?") or a place to stay he builds goodwill, is a great tourism ambassador for his region and attracts business. How long does it take? Not more than an hour every morning during his peak tourism season, he says.

This blog post on Dosh Dosh has another 17 ways to use Twitter:
1. Personal Branding
2. Getting Feedback
3. Hire People
4. Direct Traffic to Websites
5. Read News
6. Make New Friends
7. Network for Benefits
8. Use it as a To Do List
9. Business Management
10. Notify Your Customers
11. Take Notes
12. Event Updates
13. Find Prospects
14. Provide Live Coverage
15. Time Management and Analysis
16. Set Up Meetings
17. Acquire Votes
18. This one is not included on their list but works for me:)! Shorten the time in the doctor's waiting room

For more information and ideas, head over the the Dosh Dosh blog. Would love to hear if you have any other ideas.

Managing the Conversation in Social Media

Here is an interesting high level discussion about the conversation in social media - how businesses can use them, what can be gleaned from being a part of the conversation and how social media conversation is becoming the way consumers are expected to be treated. Marketers have always dreamed of engagement with their brand and suddenly social media has dropped the opportunity in our laps. The challenge is to use it effectively. Check Ralph Wilson's video out: